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Discrepancy in Practices Related to the Use of Oral Contrast in Abdominal CT Scan

Published:April 13, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acra.2019.02.019
      In the article entitled “CT for Acute Nontraumatic Abdominal Pain-Is Oral Contrast Really Required?”, published in the journal of academic radiology in July, 2017 volume 24 issue 7 the authors discussed a very important issue regarding role of oral contrast for highlighting abdominal pathology in patients presenting with nontraumatic abdominal pain in emergency setting (
      • Kessner R.
      • Barnes S.
      • Halpern P.
      • et al.
      CT for acute nontraumatic abdominal pain—is oral contrast really required?.
      ). Currently no consensus guidelines exist on this issue. Kammerer et al. concluded that positive oral contrast improves diagnostic accuracy and reader reliability (
      • Kammerer S.
      • Hoink A.J.
      • Wessling J.
      • et al.
      Abdominal and pelvic CT: is positive oral contrast still necessary? Results of a retrospective observational study.
      ). According to the authors, the use of oral contrast is noncontributory while interpreting CT images and does not add to the radiological decision making. In addition, it also increases the turnaround time by lengthening the emergency department stay and unnecessary delays in clinical decision and patient's management.
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