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Artificial Intelligence in Radiology: Some Ethical Considerations for Radiologists and Algorithm Developers

      As artificial intelligence (AI) is finding its place in radiology, it is important to consider how to guide the research and clinical implementation in a way that will be most beneficial to patients. Although there are multiple aspects of this issue, I consider a specific one: a potential misalignment of the self-interests of radiologists and AI developers with the best interests of the patients. Radiologists know that supporting research into AI and advocating for its adoption in clinical settings could diminish their employment opportunities and reduce respect for their profession. This provides an incentive to oppose AI in various ways. AI developers have an incentive to hype their discoveries to gain attention. This could provide short-term personal gains, however, it could also create a distrust toward the field if it became apparent that the state of the art was far from where it was promised to be. The future research and clinical implementation of AI in radiology will be partially determined by radiologist and AI researchers. Therefore, it is very important that we recognize our own personal motivations and biases and act responsibly to ensure the highest benefit of the AI transformation to the patients.

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