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Impact of Age, Race, and Socioeconomic Status on Women's Perceptions and Preferences Regarding Communication of Estimated Breast Cancer Risk

  • Author Footnotes
    1 No conflicts of interest or grants/assistance to disclose.
    N. Amornsiripanitch
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: N.A.
    Footnotes
    1 No conflicts of interest or grants/assistance to disclose.
    Affiliations
    University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 N Lake Ave, Worcester, MA 01655
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 No conflicts of interest or grants/assistance to disclose.
    S.M. Ameri
    Footnotes
    1 No conflicts of interest or grants/assistance to disclose.
    Affiliations
    University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 N Lake Ave, Worcester, MA 01655. Phone: (617) 894-2712
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    2 Grants/Assistance: 1 R01 HL135219-03, 7 R01 HL125089-05, 5 R01 HL126911-04, 3 U01 HL138631-03, and 1R21TW010462-02. No conflicts of interest to disclose.
    R.J. Goldberg
    Footnotes
    2 Grants/Assistance: 1 R01 HL135219-03, 7 R01 HL125089-05, 5 R01 HL126911-04, 3 U01 HL138631-03, and 1R21TW010462-02. No conflicts of interest to disclose.
    Affiliations
    University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 N Lake Ave, Worcester, MA 01655. Phone: (508) 856-8798. Fax (508) 856-8993
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    1 No conflicts of interest or grants/assistance to disclose.
    2 Grants/Assistance: 1 R01 HL135219-03, 7 R01 HL125089-05, 5 R01 HL126911-04, 3 U01 HL138631-03, and 1R21TW010462-02. No conflicts of interest to disclose.

      Rationale and Objectives

      Performing breast cancer risk assessment at the time of screening mammography has potential to increase high-risk identification, appropriate supplemental screening, and risk management. The study's goal is to investigate women's interest in risk assessment and preferred method of risk communication in a diverse patient population.

      Materials and Methods

      Surveys in English and five non-English languages were distributed to women presenting for screening mammography at eight screening mammography facilities between February and May 2019 to assess their interest in risk assessment, preferred method, and level of detail of estimated risk communication in hypothetical scenarios where estimated risks are average and elevated.

      Results

      Among 683 survey respondents, 592 (87%) expressed interest in learning about their estimated lifetime risk of breast cancer. Controlling for age, race/ethnicity, and education, women with higher income were more interested in risk assessment than comparison group (p<0.05). The most preferred method of average risk communication was by a mailed letter accompanying mammographic results (57%), but more women exclusively preferred face-to-face communications of elevated risk than of average risk estimate (191, 28% vs. 128, 19%, p<0.0001). Phone communication was more preferred by younger women, electronic communication was less preferred by older women and those with lower income, and non-Hispanic blacks and older women preferred less detailed communication (p<0.05).

      Conclusion

      Sociodemographic factors influence women's interest in risk assessment and preference in risk communication about breast cancer. Screening Mammogram facilities implementing risk assessment should consider risk communication strategies that are most effective for their patient population.

      Key Words

      Abbreviations:

      NHAA (Non-Hispanic African American, African descent or black)
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