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Beyond the Gray Scale: Using the Arts to Elevate our Work in Radiology

      It is no secret that radiology is a field with roots in physics and mathematics. However, there also are long standing connections between radiology and the arts. Certainly, many physicians are aware of the long history of artistic illustrations as a primary means of teaching anatomy. Many revered artists were also anatomists, including luminaries such as Michelangelo Buonarroti and Leonardo da Vinci (
      • Ghosh SK.
      Evolution of illustrations in anatomy: a study from the classical period in Europe to modern times.
      ). With the advent of radiographic imaging following Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen's discovery of x-rays in the late nineteenth century, anatomic education transitioned into a reliance on medical imaging and technology, with increasing complexity as the field blossomed in the twentieth century (
      • Marinkovic S
      • Stosic-Opincal T
      • Tomic O.
      Radiology and fine art.
      ). Moreover, not only were x-rays found to be extraordinarily useful in medical diagnosis, but also for the development of novel artistic techniques. Even from its infancy, radiography was employed as an art form, given the overlap with evolving photographic methods used by artists such as Man Ray and Laszlo Moholy-Nagy (
      • Marinkovic S
      • Stosic-Opincal T
      • Tomic O.
      Radiology and fine art.
      ).

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